A government consultation on plans to tighten elig

first_imgA government consultation on plans to tighten eligibility for its new disability benefit was unfair and unlawful, the court of appeal heard this week.Last year disabled campaigner and blogger Steve Sumpter failed in a judicial review of whether the government had carried out a proper consultation on its plans to slash the qualifying distance for the higher rate of mobility support from 50 metres to just 20 metres.This week, Sumpter’s case was back in court for a one-and-a-half day hearing to appeal that decision. A judgement is expected either later this month or in October.Sumpter, who can only walk a few metres with a stick, and otherwise uses a wheelchair, was assessed as eligible for the higher rate mobility component of disability living allowance (DLA), and uses that to lease a car through the Motability scheme.But the campaigner fears losing the higher rate entitlement when transferring to the new personal independence payment (PIP), and consequently losing access to a Motability vehicle.Under DLA, someone is eligible for the higher rate if they cannot walk more than 50 metres, but under the new rules for PIP – which is gradually replacing working-age DLA – this walking distance criteria has been set at just 20 metres.The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) consulted on PIP in 2012 but did not mention its plans to cut the criteria from 50 metres to 20 metres until after the consultation had closed.Last year, a judge suggested that if the consultation process had stopped at this point, he would probably have found it unfair and unlawful.But after Sumpter’s judicial review was issued, the Conservative disabled people’s minister Esther McVey was forced to carry out a second consultation, which was limited to just looking at the change to 20 metres.When McVey’s successor, Mike Penning, published his response to the consultation, he made it clear that the walking distance criteria would remain at 20 metres.Sumpter’s legal team believe that this second consultation was irrelevant, and “could never have changed the decision that had already been made”.Sumpter said: “Without access to support, I would be unable to do a huge number of activities that many people take for granted.“I would lose my Motability vehicle and would struggle to access local amenities, including supermarkets.“The government policy on eligibility would leave me completely in the lurch and massively affect my quality of life.”Sumpter added, in a blog: “It is frustrating that this case is about whether the consultation on PIP was fair rather than about the cut itself, but the courts cannot decide on government policy.“As part of their defence the DWP pointed out that they are fully aware of the impact of their policy, and are removing DLA from ‘individuals with genuine health conditions and disabilities and genuine need’ and ‘removing or reducing that benefit may affect their daily lives’.“The DWP did do a consultation on their policy, though, and that consultation wasn’t fair, so that is what we are fighting.”Last month, Sumpter’s lawyers, Irwin Mitchell, secured a significant legal victory over DWP, after a court ruled that long delays in processing PIP applications from two disabled people were “unlawful” and “unacceptable”.Alastair Wallace, a public lawyer at Irwin Mitchell, who is acting for Sumpter, said: “A reduction in the eligibility may mean that hundreds of thousands of people who would have been able to access support would now be frozen out.“Our client is not alone in this either and it is time that disabled people who have been touched by this have their voices heard on the issue.”Liz Sayce, chief executive of Disability Rights UK, said: “PIP could see thousands of disabled people become institutionalised in their own homes. “The DWP expects that [hundreds of thousands of] disabled people who currently get the higher rate mobility component will lose it altogether or receive the lower amount. “This means that many will lose their car under the Motability car scheme so they will no longer be able to get to work or get out and about.“We believe the test of policy changes relating to disability should be whether they help or hinder independence and participation in society. This change does not meet this test.”Only five individuals out of the 1,142 organisations and individuals who took part in the second consultation agreed with the government that the walking distance criteria should be set at 20 metres.Government figures predict that, with the criteria set at 20 metres, the number of people receiving higher rates of mobility support – and therefore eligible for a Motability vehicle – would plunge from 1,030,000 (if DLA had not been replaced by PIP) to just 602,000 by 2018.They also predict that 548,000 of the 892,000 working-age people who were receiving the higher rate of the DLA mobility component in February 2013 will not receive the enhanced mobility rate of PIP once they are transferred to the new benefit.last_img read more

Read More →

A leading disabled peer has been forced to stress

first_imgA leading disabled peer has been forced to stress that she does not support a government-run disability employment campaign, after civil servants mistakenly tweeted comments that suggested she had endorsed the much-criticised programme. Baroness [Jane] Campbell (pictured) had provided quotes and a photograph that she thought would be used to publicise the Power 100 list of the UK’s most influential disabled people, which was published today (Thursday).But her picture and quote were instead sent out via the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Twitter account, with the logos of both the Power 100 list – on which she features as the UK’s third most influential disabled person – and the Disability Confident campaign included alongside her photograph.There was also a reference in the tweet to the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), which took place today (Thursday).When told about the tweet by Disability News Service (DNS), Baroness Campbell said she would never have provided a quote to promote Disability Confident, and in fact had criticised ministers who set it up in the summer of 2013 as there was already a well-established campaign run by the Employers’ Forum on Disability*.She reinforced that message just five months ago, when she told a panel of civil servants – which included Pat Russell, head of DWP’s Office for Disability Issues – that she was “really worried” by the government’s emphasis on Disability Confident.She told the panel: “It seems that we are spending a lot of time on awareness campaigns that already exist, and not enough time enforcing the Equality Act.”This week, she was keen to stress that there had been a misunderstanding between her and the civil servants promoting Disability Confident, who were also supporting the Power 100 list.She told DNS: “Please tell your readers, I am not endorsing the Disability Confident initiative!”A DWP spokeswoman said: “One of our Disability Confident team approached Baroness Campbell directly and received a supportive quote for the Power 100 list to share on social media.“However, in subsequent conversations it became clear that she was not lending her endorsement to the Disability Confident campaign and we removed her quote from social media.”Disability Confident has been criticised for its overly non-confrontational approach to employers, for duplicating the work of the forum, and for sending out messages that appear to contrast with those issued by work and pensions ministers keen to stress their “anti-scrounger” credentials.One campaigner said after the 2013 launch: “I was inspiring and a role model, got awards for it. The illness progressed more. Now called scrounger. #disabilityconfident.”Another tweeted: “Too much #DisabilityConfident concerned our personal attributes, not the structural barriers and oppression we face #DisabilityConfident.”*Now known as the Business Disability Forumlast_img read more

Read More →

A new scholarship programme aims to fasttrack dis

first_imgA new scholarship programme aims to fast-track disabled people towards leadership positions in the physical activity sector.The Matrix LeadAbility Scholarship Programme will offer at least four bursaries worth £6, 000 each in its first year, the second new scheme in just a month designed to support disabled people into leadership positions in different industries.The programme is being run by the physical activity charity ukactive – which is chaired by retired Paralympian Baroness [Tanni] Grey-Thompson – and the disability charity Aspire.Only last month, Arts Council England said it would spend more than a million pounds on bursaries for nine disabled leaders in the arts and cultural sectors, to help them gain the experience, knowledge, skills and confidence to compete for future posts as artistic directors, chief executives or other senior positions.LeadAbility will fund £6,000 places for the four “brightest and best disabled up and coming leaders” in the physical activity sector to attend a week-long course at the IESE Business School in Barcelona, ranked as having the best MBA course in Europe by the Economist magazine.Sport England’s Active People Survey has shown that disabled people are half as likely to be physically active as non-disabled people, and ukactive said that ensuring industry jobs were more accessible to disabled staff would be a “significant step towards rectifying this”.LeadAbility aims to build on the success of InstructAbility, an award-winning programme led by Aspire, which provides disabled people with free and accessible training and qualifications in the physical activity sector, followed by an industry work placement, and which has so far trained more than 300 instructors.Baroness Grey-Thompson said: “LeadAbility provides a fantastic opportunity to diversify our workforce by helping disabled people land senior positions in the physical activity sector based solely on merit.“It also demonstrates another proactive step towards being the all-inclusive sector that we aspire to be, whether it is in our teams or growing our market by attracting new people through our doors who might have previously felt our services were not for them – both disabled people and the wider population.”Steven Ward, executive director of ukactive, said: “LeadAbility will unlock the door to boardrooms across the physical activity sector, levelling the playing field and offering the most talented disabled individuals a route to the top.”But he added: “It is only worth applying if there is total confidence that a candidate has the ability to one day serve as a CEO or senior director of one of the leading organisations in our sector.”Penny Mordaunt, minister for disabled people, said: “Everyone deserves the chance to fulfil their potential and pursue their goals, and I’m delighted to see LeadAbility supporting young talent and creating opportunities for more disabled people to reach senior leadership roles.”Jon Johnston, managing director of Matrix Fitness UK, which is sponsoring LeadAbility, said: “These bursaries will give disabled people access to a fantastic training programme that will fast-track them to senior positions and hopefully support their long-term career goals and aspirations.”Research by Disability Rights UK (DR UK), which runs its own Leadership Academy Programme, has found that non-disabled people are three times as likely as disabled people to earn over £80,000 a year, and twice as likely to be board-level directors.Sue Bott, DR UK’s deputy chief executive, said it was too early to say if there was a trend developing of organisations offering such leadership schemes for disabled people, but she said the two new schemes were “definitely a welcome development”. She said: “As with other groups, disabled people do face a glass ceiling when they get into work, but unlike race and gender this has yet to attract a lot of attention.”She added: “One of our key priorities is that disabled people should be able to get into work, stay on in work and thrive in work. “We therefore welcome this initiative from ukactive that will give disabled people an opportunity to train to be leaders in sports organisations. “As with a similar programme for the arts, funded by the Arts Council, Change Makers, this is welcome recognition that not only do these organisations need to be employing more disabled people but that we should be able to get on and reach the top in our careers. “This is also the underlying principle behind our own Leadership Academy Programme.”Picture (from left to right): Hilary Farmiloe, InstructAbility manager for Aspire; Steve Ward, ukactive executive director; Penny Mordaunt, minister for disabled people; Joe Townsend, Matrix ambassador; and Michelle Smith, Matrix marketing executivelast_img read more

Read More →

The government has confirmed in the Queens speech

first_imgThe government has confirmed in the Queen’s speech that it plans to consult on its proposals to address the funding crisis affecting older people’s social care, but has again failed to make any mention of the needs of working-age disabled people.Conservative plans for the funding of social care for older people – particularly on charging – were widely seen as one of the reasons the party failed to secure an overall parliamentary majority in this month’s general election.But it was also criticised for failing to include any mention of how it would reform the funding of working-age social care.Yesterday’s Queen’s speech includes 27 bills and draft bills that the government plans to introduce over the next two years, with much of its focus on the process of leaving the European Union.The speech includes a pledge to “bring forward proposals for consultation” on social care.But the briefing notes published alongside the speech ignore the social care needs of working-age disabled people, and say instead that the government will “work to address the challenges of social care for our ageing population” by “bringing forward proposals for consultation”.They also say that “further reform is required to ensure that the system is prepared to meet the challenges of the increasing numbers of over 75s”, and that the consultation will “set out options to improve the social care system and to put it on a more secure financial footing, supporting people, families and communities to prepare for old age”.A Department of Health (DH) spokesman said that the consultation was likely to be via a green paper – although a white paper was also possible – which would be published “fairly soon” and “almost definitely” this year.The controversial social care charging policy proposed by the Tories in their manifesto originally revolved around allowing every older person to retain at least £100,000 of their assets and savings, while the value of people’s homes would be taken into account – when calculating charges – for those receiving domiciliary care as well as those receiving residential care.But following widespread criticism, May announced that there would also be a lifetime cap on the amount spent on care charges, although she did not say at what level this would be set.Asked if the consultation would include these proposals, the DH spokesman said: “She will consult on those limits, that is our understanding.”last_img read more

Read More →

A disabled refugee who was murdered after years of

first_imgA disabled refugee who was murdered after years of racist harassment and abuse was repeatedly failed by a police force and his local authority, according to a long-awaited review into the events that led to his death.The review by the Safer Bristol Partnership found that both Bristol City Council and Avon and Somerset police were guilty of institutional racism and discrimination in the way they dealt with years of complaints by Bijan Ebrahimi.But disabled campaigners have also raised concerns at the failure of the council and police to recognise Ebrahimi as a victim of disability hate crime.Ebrahimi was murdered on 14 July 2013, but the report found that he had been the victim of years of racially-motivated offending after coming to the UK from Iran as a refugee in 2000.Although there are repeated references in the report to Ebrahimi’s “vulnerability”, the review “uncovered no evidence to indicate that any of [the] victimisation was motivated by his disability”.But it did point out – following concerns raised by disability hate crime campaigners in the aftermath of his murder – that he was “a disabled man wrongly labelled by some local members of the community as a paedophile”.The report says: “There have been a number of recent cases documented in which disabled men have been similarly labelled, targeted and even murdered because of such labels.”The review also points out that an inquiry into disability-related harassment by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, in 2011, “made a number of findings that resonate with this review”, including the tendency of public bodies to “respond to individual incidents rather than patterns of behaviour and to focus on victims’ behaviour and suggest restrictions to their lives rather than deal with perpetrators”.The review’s publication comes two months after the conviction of a man for the brutal murder of another disabled refugee in Bristol.Friends of Kamil Ahmad told Disability News Service in October that, like Ebrahimi, he had repeatedly told police officers that he was being threatened and racially abused.Ahmad’s murder in July 2016 took place little more than a mile away from the Brislington area of the city where Ebrahimi had been murdered three years earlier.The review into the murder of Bijan Ebrahimi says that both the council and police force appear to have given little consideration to “the context of his life in Bristol as a single Iranian man living alone with a number of specific difficulties in relation to disability, speech and language and health”.The council had decided that he did not fulfil the “threshold criteria” to be viewed as a “vulnerable tenant”, which, the review concludes, could have “been important in highlighting Mr Ebrahimi’s circumstances and what was required to address them”.Among the review’s 14 recommendations, it calls on the council to undertake an “immediate review” of its tenants who have “multiple, complex needs” to ensure their needs are being met.It also says the council should change its “vulnerable tenants policy” so that “the qualifying threshold criteria definition of a vulnerable tenant does not exclude those who are able to ‘live independently’”, and draw up a new policy for “accurately assessing existing and new tenants for vulnerability”.The council said afterwards that these recommendations had already been implemented, while it was “currently trialling a new approach to assessing vulnerability for new tenants” and was “continuing to monitor our approach to vulnerability to ensure that we meet the needs of our tenants”.The review says that Ebrahimi was the victim of “a pattern of repeated harassment, assault and criminal damage, some of it serious and much of it racially aggravated” from 2005 until his murder, and that he made at least 44 allegations to the police, many of which were wrongly not recorded as crimes.He also made many allegations to the council and other agencies in the city.The review found that he “suffered real injuries, his property was repeatedly damaged and he has been observed to be in real distress and fear as a result of this victimisation”.Ebrahimi had repeatedly asked police officers for help and protection (pictured) in the three days leading up to his murder, following an unprovoked attack and further threats.But instead of providing protection, police officers arrested him – twice – and refused his further appeals for help, after he told them he was being threatened by some of his neighbours, who wrongly claimed he was a paedophile.Shortly after his final phone call to police, Ebrahimi was beaten and kicked to death, and his body set alight, by 24-year-old Lee James, who lived just a few doors away in Capgrave Crescent, on the edge of Bristol.The review concludes that there was little evidence of “purposeful commitment” to investigate the victimisation Ebrahimi had experienced over the years, by the council or police force, or to “bring anyone to account for having perpetrated it or bring it to a halt”.It says that he was “repeatedly targeted for racist abuse and victimisation by some members of the public, that this was repeatedly reported to Avon and Somerset Constabulary and Bristol City Council and that representatives of both organisations repeatedly sided with his abusers.“The more incidents that were reported, the more ingrained this pattern of responses became right up to Mr Ebrahimi’s death,” it adds.And it concludes that there is evidence of “both discriminatory behaviour and institutional racism on the part of Bristol City Council and Avon and Somerset Constabulary”.Bristol and South West Disabled People Against Cuts (BSWDPAC) said the review showed “a systemic failure by both Bristol City Council and the police to give due recognition to the intersection of disablism and racism, both in their own institutions and in dealing with perpetrators of hate crime”.A BSWDPAC spokesman said: “Despite the patterns identified in hate crime research, disabled people, refugees and asylum seekers subjected to violence and abuse are often labelled as ‘unreliable’, or as perpetrators of crime themselves.“As a consequence, victims, often those that experience mental distress, are not listened to or believed. “Rather than be supported, victims are often portrayed as ‘other’ and the context of their lives, distress and trauma is ignored and invalidated.  “Despite Bijan Ebrahimi’s attempts to be heard as a victim of racist abuse, he was wrongly labelled as ‘the primary problem’ with police making reference to Bijan ‘suffering from a mental health problem’.“As Dr Sarah Carr identifies in a recent report, ‘victims may not describe or recognise their experience as a disability/mental health related ‘hate crime’, and professionals may not classify or recognise it as such.’  “We would urge the council and police to take action that learns from such research, and to truly include disabled people, refugees and asylum-seekers in addressing hate crime.” Katharine Quarmby, a coordinator of the Disability Hate Crime Network and the author of Scapegoat, a pioneering investigation into disability hate crime, who has written about the death of Bijan Ebrahimi, also raised concerns about the failure to recognise the disability hate crime aspects of Bijan Ebrahimi’s ordeal.She said: “I welcome the multi-agency review and its finding that institutional racism was a key factor in the harassment and violence that Bijan Ebrahimi suffered and it is also good that the unconscious bias that may have motivated some of the attacks around Bijan’s disability was also briefly hinted at in the report.”But she said she was disappointed that the report did not go further than this, given that the kind of false accusations of paedophilia made against Ebrahimi “are so damaging” and are often made against disabled men.The mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, who was only elected in May 2016 – becoming the first mayor of black African-Caribbean descent of a European city – said the council accepted all the review’s findings.He said: “We appreciate that no amount of lessons learned or changes in practice can possibly mitigate the impact this had on Bijan and his family.“However, we assure the family and the public that every effort will continue to be made, building on the considerable work that has already been completed by the council as part of the Safer Bristol Partnership, to further identify how we need to change and improve.“We are committed to working with the family and other partners to achieve this objective in memory of Bijan.”The publication of the review was delayed by nearly four years to avoid prejudicing criminal trials, and an investigation by the Independent Police Complaints Commission, which published its findings in July.last_img read more

Read More →

Distillations Things change but not at Uptown Thank God — and thank

first_imgSomething was wrong as I walked into Uptown, on 17th. A feeling I’d never had in this bar before. Uptown is a single, large room divided into two medium-sized spaces by a beautiful wooden bar. One area is for sitting, with bar stools, tables, and couches, while the other is for standing, with a pool table, pinball machine, jukebox, and just a couple more chairs. It has mostly bare walls, with a lot of what looks to be original wood and trim, with just enough weird on it to enhance its “dive” character rather than “make a statement about dive bars.” The furniture is the kind you’d feel great about getting off Craigslist for no money, and comfortable. Nothing had changed, but something was off. I sat down on a stool next to “Allen,” and finally figured it out. “It seems so … clean …” I said. It was weirdly like a demo home. It was “sanitary” in the most aggressive way you can mean that. Antiseptic. Whereas before it had always been clean, but in that way where you visit a friend and they say “sorry for the mess” as you walk into their living room. And yeah, it’s ratty, but who cares, because it’s you. Because we’ve had so many good times here that at least three of the whiskey stains on the carpet came from me, two in the same very good night. Uptown has always been like that. Today it felt like I’d walked into a different bar with an identical layout.“Hey,” Allen said, reaching out to calm me down. “They literally just cleaned. Just finished.”“Yeah,” the bartender agreed. “Just.”Okay then, it wasn’t in my mind: That was, in fact, a genuine aroma of cleaning products lingering in the air.“They’ve gotta spruce the place up once in a while,” Allen said.“Yeah,” the bartender agreed again. “You know, for spring.”“You don’t have to worry, this place is never going legit,” Allen said.“Well, you never know,” I told him. “Actually, hasn’t this dive just been named a historic business in the city?”Allen gaped. “Really?”The bartender nodded. “We’re a legacy business now.”“That’s amazing!” Allen said. And then he turned to his right, and looked up at a stained glass portrait of Scott Ellsworth, the founding owner of Uptown, gazing down on the bar, grinning as though he knew something we didn’t, surrounded by the words “buy your own damn bar,” which had been his motto in life. Allen raised up his beer. “Thanks, Scott.”The bartender looked at the picture too for a moment, grinned, and said, “Saints die.”And a moment later, “what are you drinking?”The staff of the Uptown out to lunch with the bar’s original owner Scott Ellsworth (right) in 2010. Ellsworth died in 2014. Photo courtesy of Jessica Gensley.Given the presence of a San Francisco secular saint in stained glass — Ellsworth was a noted member of the San Francisco Cacophony Society back in its heyday — I felt like the only way to follow a statement like that was with a chalice of some sacred brandy. But I’d have had to bring my own, since Uptown doesn’t do anything like that. Uptown’s beer menu is prosaic, while its cocktail menu is eclectic, in the very best sense of the term: not “carefully curated to represent a broad swath of tastes and influence” but “whatever the fuck we feel like making right now.” And you really never know what that will be until you get there. Because the bartender had made a joke about spring cleaning, I ordered a Spring Fever (handcrafted botanical gin, St. Germain elderflower liquor), which was … well, look, it’s a dive bar. Since the subject of Scott Ellsworth had come up, and Allen had known him back in the day, we had to talk at least a little about him. Which is appropriate, since his legacy is still felt in every corner of Uptown, and he is the very much the reason the bar is now considered a Mission legacy business today.Ellsworth started the bar in the 1980s because, so far as I can tell, he just wanted a goddamn bar he liked, and kept it almost entirely the same for 30 years, down to personally curating all the songs in the jukebox. As the Mission changed around it, Uptown remained a downscale ’80s bar: a place where people from the neighborhood, who seemed like they could somehow afford to live here waiting tables or painting houses while they worked on their bands or their machine art, would all hang out. It wasn’t reverse-snobby or exclusive: Techies were welcomed too, provided they didn’t act like they had something to prove. Uptown had that wonderful, asshole-proof quality that a bar with nothing to prove can get, because assholes want people to take them seriously, and nobody at Scott Ellsworth’s house ever did.But saints die, and Ellsworth passed unexpectedly in 2014. Miraculously, his family was able to work out an arrangement to sell the bar to its longtime employees — meaning it is now worker-owned, and the bartender we’ve been chatting with is also a boss. The commitment was to keep it exactly the way Ellsworth would have wanted it, and I think they have — although maybe the tunes in the jukebox have slipped a little bit.We do another round, and this time I order an Uptown Margarita (100 percent agave and fresh lime, served in a pint glass), which is just perfect. I’ll get two more of those before I go. By the time the early evening crowd has come in, Allen and I have moved on to talking about other dead friends, and the kind of legacy we hope they’ve left. By 7 p.m., Uptown is filled with lively conversation and people from all walks of life. A few of them look like they’ve made it big, most look like they’re barely hanging on, some are young and fresh faced, but all of them look like regulars. The thing they have in common: They appreciate a man who got his own damn bar and then opened it up to the world, and they have nothing to prove. They don’t look down on used furniture, or the truly monstrous bathroom, covered in paint and graffiti, with a trough for a urinal, Castro-style. They take it all as it is, and love a whiskey stain that comes with a good story.It shows. Email Addresscenter_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterlast_img read more

Read More →

EXTRAORDINARY PEOPLE Mowing into Greatness

first_imgOAK ISLAND, NC (WWAY) — A lot of kids mow lawns during the summer months to get a little extra spending cash while they are out of school. We found two boys in the Cape Fear who are doing it for folks who can’t mow on their own.WWAY’s Daniel Seamans introduces us to our Extraordinary People of the Week who just hit a major milestone.The Oak Island Senior Center has a new look and it is courtesy of two boys with big hearts. “We just help people,” Stone Dennis told Daniel Seamans.  “(We’re)Helping the disabled and elderly,” his brother Dayne added.- Advertisement – The two are mowing lawns in Brunswick County as a way to give back to the community.“We mow people’s, elderly people’s lawns for them so if they can’t mow, we mow them for them,” Stone said.Tuesday was a big day for the two. “2-3 lawns a day, sometimes one, today will be 50,” Dayne said.The 50th lawn just happens to be at a place that hosts folks 50 and older.  “How does it make you feel? Great,” Stone said of mowing the lawn at the Oak Island Senior Center.For the past two summers, Stone and Dayne Dennis have been the ‘Raising Men Lawn Care Service of Southport, volunteering lawn care for people in Brunswick County in need of some help.“(We do)Weed wacking, mowing the lawns, picking up branches, or raking in the fall,” Dayne said. “My mom saw it on Facebook, so she said we could start this so she wanted to start raising me lawn care service too, and the guy said okay.”Donna Martindale is their mother. She saw a post from a man in Alabama who had started the nationwide project and got the green light to start it in the Cape Fear. “It’s teaching them to go out and talk to people and interact with them,” Donna said.Mom supervises and helps out too. “It makes me feel good,” she said. “I’m glad they are out here doing this not just in the house playing games.”Stone and Dayne Dennis aren’t just playing games. They are making a difference. And not just in a yard….but in a community. That makes you(two), EXTRAORDINARY!The founder of the 50 Yard Challenge says that after the kids complete their 50 yards, they fly to them, do lawns with them, present them new shirts and certificates and also brand new mowers .Check out their Facebook page, here!last_img read more

Read More →

William Mary claims CAA title with 42 victory over UNCW

first_imgHARRISONBURG, VA (UNCW SPORTS) — Junior forward Antonio Bustamante scored three goals in the second half as fifth-seeded William & Mary overcame a one-goal deficit to claim the Colonial Athletic Association men’s soccer championship with a 4-2 victory over second-seeded UNCW at James Madison’s Sentara Park on Sunday afternoon.The win, which extended William & Mary’s unbeaten streak to 10 consecutive matches, earned the Tribe (11-4-5) its eighth CAA crown and the league’s automatic berth into the NCAA Tournament. UNCW, meanwhile, falls to 11-7-0 after reaching the league final for the second time in program history.- Advertisement – Led by Bustamante, the Tribe bounced back from a 1-0 deficit by scoring four times in the second half. After sophomore midfielder Julian Ngoh tied the game just under nine minutes into the second half, Bustamante scored three goals over a 12-minute span to give William & Mary a 4-1 advantage it did not relinquish.Junior midfielder Matt Gianfortone closed the scoring in the final seconds by blasting a 20-yard shot past redshirt senior goalkeeper Phil Breno for the first goal of his college career.UNCW took a 1-0 lead midway through the first half when redshirt senior forward Julio Moncada tallied his fifth goal of the season on a long free kick from 25 yards.Related Article: Family warns methanol could be possible cause of tourist deathsWilliam & Mary, which avenged a 2-1 loss against the Seahawks in the regular season, outshot the Seahawks by a 13-8 margin.Moncada, who scored a goal in both of the Seahawks’ CAA Tournament games, was named to the CAA All-Tournament Team along with sophomore forward Phillip Goodrum and freshman forward Emil Elveroth.Bustamante was selected as the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player after netting seven goals in William & Mary’s three victories. Up Next: The Seahawks await a possible at-large berth into the NCAA Tournament field when the selections are announced on Monday, Nov. 13, at 1 p.m.last_img read more

Read More →

Man sentenced to life in 2013 Columbus County murder

first_img On October 8, 2013, deputies with Columbus County Sheriff’s Office were called to a shooting just outside of Tabor City on Shug Norris Road.Lee Travis Wright, 20, of Chadbourn, died.After the guilty verdict, Wright’s father and mother passionately addressed the court and defendant, detailing the life of their son and the impact that this has had on their lives.Darrius Hunter (Photo: District’s Attorney Office)Related Article: Second Sneads Ferry daycare worker charged with assaulting babyA judge sentenced Hunter to live in prison without the possibility of parole, plus 35-43 years in the NC Dept. of Corrections.Co-defendant and brother of Demoncrick Hunter, Darrius Hunter, entered a plea of guilty on November 27 to second degree murder and received a sentence of 16 to 20 years in prison. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — A man will spend life in prison for a 2013 shooting outside of Tabor City that left one man dead and sent another to the hospital.A jury convicted Demoncrick Hunter of first degree murder, attempted murder, conspiracy to commit robbery with a dangerous weapon, and robbery with a dangerous weapon.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Read More →

Florence impact forces changes in 2 New Hanover polling places

first_img(Photo: WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – It’s been more than a month since Hurricane Florence, but the storm’s impacts continue, including leading to a couple of changes for Election Day.The New Hanover County Board of Elections has made temporary changes to two Election Day polling locations because of impacts from Florence. Only voters who live in these precincts are affected by the change.All voters who reside in precinct W30 will vote on Election Day at JC Roe Center located at 2875 Worth Dr., Wilmington, NC 28412.All voters who reside in precinct H12 will vote on Election Day at Blair Elementary School located at 416 Edgewater Club Rd., Wilmington, NC 28411.- Advertisement – Voters are reminded of their three voting options: Absentee-by-Mail; early voting; or Election Day. voters may request that an absentee ballot be sent to the place they are staying, even if that is not their residence or mailing address.During the early voting period, which started last week and runs through November 3, voters may vote in person at any of the five convenient early voting locations in New Hanover County.On Election Day, Tuesday, November 6, voters in these precincts may only vote at their temporary polling places named above.Related Article: Cruz fends off O’Rourke in Texas Senate raceFor more information on the temporary polling place change, voting options and other election-related matters, please contact the New Hanover County Board of Elections by visiting NHCvote.com or calling (910) 798-7330.last_img read more

Read More →