Shaftesbury net asset value increases by 20%

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Richard Smallwood Named Sumitomo Executive Officer

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  From Tire ReviewAdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementSumitomo Rubber North America’s President and CEO Richard Smallwood has been appointed to executive officer of Sumitomo Rubber Industries.Smallwood will continue to serve as president and CEO of Sumitomo Rubber North America, a position he has held since April 2011.The board of directors will officially approve Smallwood’s appointment at its meeting on March 30.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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London Fire Brigade calls for tighter controls on acetylene

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Haldor Topsoe initiates search to find investor

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Talisman: Jack-up rig Maersk Giant to work on Varg field

first_imgTalisman Energy AS (TENAS) has received consent from the Petroleum Safety Authority (PSA) Norway to use the Mærsk Giant jack-up rig for well plugging on the Varg field in the Norwegian North Sea.Talisman will use Mærsk Giant for plugging wells 15/12-A-2, A-4, A-9, A-11, A-12, A-13, A-15 and A-16 on the Varg field.The company has allocated up to 153 days for the activity, which will start in mid-May 2015. Water depth at the site is 367 metres.Varg is an oil field located south of Sleipner East in the central sector of the North Sea. The field will be produced using the Petrojarl Varg production vessel, which has integrated oil storage and is tied to the Varg A well-head facility.The wells will be drilled by Mærsk Giant which is a jack-up drilling rig owned and operated by the A.P. Møller-Mærsk Group.It was built in Japan by Hitachi and completed in 1986.[mappress mapid=”1656″]last_img read more

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New PII market entrant

first_imgA new insurer has entered the solicitors’ professional indemnity insurance (PII) market focusing on firms of up to five partners, the Law Society disclosed last week. Vision Underwriting Limited, whose ultimate parent company is US insurance giant Liberty Mutual Group, will be trading both on a direct basis, and online under the name Legal and Professional Insurance. The insurer has also signed a deal with the Society to take over Solicitors Indemnity Fund (SIF) run-off claims. Vision said its ‘method of filtering out [only] the very best firms’ and concerns over the cost of the assigned risks pool (ARP) will constrain the number of firms it insures. Nevertheless, its entrance will serve as a much-needed boost to the solicitors’ PII market. More than 3,000 law firms and sole practitioners may need to find alternative cover during the coming renewals season because of the expected departure of Irish insurer Quinn from the market, and an announcement by Hiscox that it is pulling out of solicitors’ PII altogether. George Raubenheimer, managing director of Legal and Professional Insurance, said: ‘We are well aware that this area of the market [one- to five-partner firms] has not been profitable for underwriters for a number of years, but we also know there are a number of very good practices and it is these that we are trying to help.’ Law Society chief executive Des Hudson said: ‘The Society has secured an excellent result for the profession, which secures the viability of the handling of SIF run-off claims at a reasonable cost, when we are working hard to keep to a minimum the overheads on solicitors.’ He added that he was ‘delighted’ to welcome another PII insurer.last_img read more

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LSC debt collection tactics criticised

first_imgDelays in granting legal aid by the Legal Services Commission and ‘aggressive’ enforcement by its debt collectors of legal aid contributions are causing anxiety for clients and have driven some to attempt suicide, the Gazette has learned. Solicitors have complained that the LSC is taking too long to grant legal aid to clients, leaving some forced to represent themselves in the magistrates’ courts. However, they claim that where defendants are required to make a financial contribution towards their legal costs, the LSC’s debt collection agency Rossendales has been too quick to begin collecting any payments due from clients as soon as legal aid is assessed. The Gazette has been told of three cases where the stress caused by these problems has led defendants to attempt or contemplate suicide. In one instance, a defendant in an assault case received a letter from Rossendales demanding £7,000 and threatening to send bailiffs, two weeks after legal aid had been granted. The defendant became so distressed that he threatened to kill himself, and his family had to follow him to prevent him harming himself at a railway line. In another case, a defendant who was on full legal aid with no contribution due telephoned his solicitor in a suicidal state after receiving a demand for £6,000 from Rossendales. In the third instance, a defendant attempted to commit suicide when a delay in granting legal aid by the LSC left him without representation the day before the start of his Crown court trial. Jill Eastwood, Crown court caseworker at Tuckers in Manchester, said Rossendales’ actions were ‘oppressive’. She cited one case where it had taken more than four months for legal aid to be granted, leaving the defendant to attend his committal hearing unrepresented. Within days of legal aid being granted, the client received a letter from Rossendales chasing payment. ‘The client, who has no previous convictions, was very panicky when they received the letter threatening enforcement action. This behaviour is oppressive,’ she said. Robin Murray, senior partner at Kent firm Robin Murray & Co, said: ‘It takes ages to obtain legal aid, and then almost immediately the attack dogs are let loose in the form of debt collection agencies. It’s too aggressive.’ Rodney Warren, director of the Criminal Law Solicitors Association, said: ‘For some people, facing criminal charges is the most frightening thing to happen in their lives. The delay in sorting out legal aid adds to their stress, and receiving letters threatening enforcement action is terrifying.’ An LSC spokesman, also commenting on behalf of Rossendales, said: ‘We take allegations of this nature seriously. If anyone feels that they have been unfairly pressured into paying a contribution, we and Rossendales would be keen to see specific evidence so we can investigate. Where an applicant has been assessed as able to pay, based on information they themselves provided, it is right that we expect to collect.’ The spokesman said there is a code of conduct to ensure the collection process is handled with sensitivity where applicants are vulnerable. In relation to delay in processing applications, he said the LSC had recently had an issue with some applications which have not been fully completed, or completed incorrectly and had to be returned. He added that it aims to process 90% of applications within two days, and 100% within six days.last_img read more

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Global corporations turn to independent agents claims WCA

first_imgSuperior service levels, reliability and intimate local distribution knowledge and a close network of professional partners around the world are proving increasingly attractive to large international companies with global reach, WCAclaims. At the WCA’s 2nd African Regional Freight Forwarders Conference, to be held in Nairobi from 26-28 June, shippers will be seeking the best independent agents to fulfill their transportation demands. A US-headquartered corporation – one of the world’s leading providers in the fields of aviation, combat systems, armaments, munitions, ship-building and marine systems and information systems and technology – has targeted the Nairobi event and is sending a delegation with a mandate to fulfill a global 54-country contract worth many millions of dollars. With annual revenues of over USD32 billion, the industrial giant is typical of many global powerhouses that are upping their quota of independent agents to facilitate their complex and extensive transport and logistics needs. The company believes the event is ideal in terms of attendees, location and timing to acquire the worldwide independent partners it requires for its future needs. Multinational freight forwarder companies will not be eligible for the contract. Event organizer and WCA Family of Logistic Networks President, David Yokeum, said: “We are delighted to welcome this globally-recognised company to our event in Nairobi. It is clear that many large corporations are increasingly seeing the huge benefits offered by high-quality independent agents and the added value they can bring to the supply chain. With many of the world’s finest independent freight forwarders in attendance, the conference is set to be an outstanding success.” The 2nd African Freight Forwarders Conference is open to shippers and all independent freight forwarders and will utilise a One-on-One meeting scheduler to ensure all delegates maximize the new business opportunities available. For more information please visit: www.wcafamily.com/meeting/african2011last_img read more

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Trump says media ‘doesn’t want to report’ extremist attacks

first_img MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AP) – President Donald Trump is accusing the media of deliberately minimizing coverage of the threat posed by the Islamic State group, saying news outlets “have their reasons” for not reporting what he described as a “genocide” underway at the hands of the group.The president did not immediately offer evidence to support his claim, made during the new commander in chief’s visit Monday to the headquarters for U.S. Central Command.Later, the White House released a list of 78 attacks it described as “executed or inspired by” the Islamic State group since September 2014. The White House said “most” on the list did not get sufficient media attention, although it did not explain how it defined the term. Some of the incidents on the list received widespread attention and deep reporting.“You’ve seen what happened in Paris and Nice. All over Europe it’s happening. It’s gotten to a point where it’s not even being reported,” Trump told a group of military leaders and troops during the visit. “And in many cases, the very, very dishonest press doesn’t want to report it. They have their reasons and you understand that.”Trump, who has made relentless criticism of the media a hallmark of his presidency, did not explain why he thinks news outlets minimize attention on such attacks.Later, White House spokesman Sean Spicer tried to tone down the president’s remarks, saying it was a question of balance: “Like a protest gets blown out of the water, and yet an attack or a foiled attack doesn’t necessarily get the same coverage.”The list released late Monday included incidents like a truck massacre in Nice, France, that killed dozens and received widespread attention, as well as less high-profile incidents in which nobody was killed.The AP could not verify that each of the incidents had connections to the Islamic State group. The list appeared to be hastily assembled, including several misspellings of the word “attacker.”Trump also used the visit to CENTCOM to defend his immigration and refugee restrictions and reaffirm his support for NATO.He laced his speech with references to homeland security amid a court battle over his travel ban on people from seven majority-Muslim countries. He did not directly mention the case now before a federal appeals court after a lower court temporarily suspended the ban.“We need strong programs” so that “people that love us and want to love our country and will end up loving our country are allowed in” and those who “want to destroy us and destroy our country” are kept out, Trump said.“Freedom, security and justice will prevail,” Trump added. “We will defeat radical Islamic terrorism and we will not allow it to take root in our country. We’re not going to allow it.” Published: February 7, 2017 5:56 PM EST Trump says media ‘doesn’t want to report’ extremist attacks Author: Associated Press center_img SHARE Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.last_img read more

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LSB chair bows out with splenetic attack on legal ‘trade unions’

first_imgThe outgoing chair of ‘super-regulator’ the Legal Services Board yesterday launched a fierce attack on the profession’s principal representative bodies, accusing them of resisting freemarket reforms that are ‘in the interests of consumers’.Speaking at yesterday’s Modern Law conference in London, David Edmonds said his group has had ‘battle after battle’ with representative bodies the Law Society and the Bar Council.Edmonds (pictured), who steps down this week, called the groups ‘trade unions’ which have never accepted the legitimacy of the LSB and the Legal Services Act which created it.But representatives of the profession vigorously defended their stance on regulation, urging the government not to accede to Edmonds’ wish for a single overarching regulator which would sit ‘in the pocket of government’.At the same conference, justice minister Shailesh Vara said a response to the government’s consultation on regulation, which closed last September, is expected ‘very soon’.Edmonds told delegates that representative bodies had shown a ‘failure to recognise that life has changed – going back is not an option’.He added: ‘I don’t admire a hostile attitude to change, resistance to an approach about better meeting the needs of consumers. Unfortunately this is something I have often come to expect from those who purport to speak on behalf of the legal profession.‘Resistance to our very existence even though we are a creature of statute, willed into being by parliament, has been worrying. The past always seems more important that the future.’Edmonds said his one regret from his time as the first LSB chair was not pursuing more forcibly a wholesale rewriting of rule books.‘The current rule books have too much baggage, too much incremental change, too much planning for every eventuality – the details and level of prescription have created a culture of dependency within the sector. Professionals are deemed unable to think for themselves about what is right and what is wrong in a given situation.’He added that the government should remove the statutory guarantee of funding for professional bodies and pursue a single regulator, although he conceded there would be little appetite for any political party to create one.Edmonds’ comments provoked an impassioned response from representative bodies and the audience. Law Society chief executive Desmond Hudson agreed with a delegate who noted that the ‘consumer interest is not the same as the public interest’.Hudson said: ‘The Legal Services Act says the LSB is here to assist frontline regulators. That role could be easily achieved by being chaired by a judge appointed by the lord chief justice. It would create space for all [solicitors] to innovate, compete and operate in international markets.’Baroness Deech, chair of the Bar Standard Boards, said a single regulator would create new problems. ‘We have seen what happened with a single huge regulator in financial services. The LSB is always trumpeting competition and we need competition in regulation.‘With a monopoly there is no less chance of a mistake. We’re subject all the time to information from the LSB which we simply know to be wrong. Do we want a single regulator staffed by quango kings and queens in the pocket of government?’last_img read more

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