Aftermarket Auto Parts Alliance / Alliance Parts Warehouse Announces Key Employee Promotions

first_imgJames “Coy” PeachDax NealAftermarket Auto Parts Alliance and Alliance Parts Warehouse announced the recent promotions of Dax Neal to warehouse operations manager, and James “Coy” Peach to director of continuous improvement/operations.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementNeal previously held the positions of packaging manager and technology operations manager, implementing Epicor’s TPW and MAM Software’s Auto Part WMS systems at APW. Prior to joining Alliance Parts Warehouse, he worked in the real estate/mortgage industry.“Service is our mission. I am tasked with providing the Alliance shareholders with service second-to-none through focus, innovation and execution, as well as supporting and leading the people who work in our APW warehouse operations,” said Neal.“The combination of his past direct experience in operations, coupled with his recent experience managing the technology that drives our operation gives Dax the perfect background for his new role,” said Max Dull, APW’s vice president and general manager.  “We congratulate Dax on his new appointment and know that with his leadership we will continue to drive operational efficiencies through greater use of technology going forward.”Dull continued, “Our operations team, previously lead by Coy, has laid out a master plan for continuous improvement focused on three areas, which include review of all warehouse processes, remapping of inventory locations for greater picking efficiencies and full implementation of scanning technology. With Dax Neal now looking after our daily operations, it will allow Coy to focus on implementation of the operations improvement master plan and ongoing continuous improvement actions, leveraging his many years of experience.”Advertisement“It’s my goal to help enhance existing programs and processes, improve effectiveness, foster a collaborative work environment and tap the expertise of employees,” said Peach.last_img read more

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Aluminium used to create hydrogen fuel

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Alaska LNG project gets federal approval

first_imgThe decision means construction and operation can get underway at the long-awaited Alaska LNG Project, an integrated pipeline project that includes a treatment facility on the North Slope, an 800-mile long pipeline and liquefaction facility at tidewater.“Today’s federal authorisation is a key step in determining if Alaska LNG is competitive and economically beneficial for Alaska,” said Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy.The FERC granted permission to the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation (AGDC) yesterday, culminating six years of public input, engineering, science-based environmental research, and cultural resource studies incorporating more than 150,000 pages of environmental, engineering, and cultural data.“FERC’s authorisation validates that the Alaska LNG Project can be safely built and operated, delivering numerous potential benefits with manageable environmental impacts,” AGDC President Frank Richards said.“This approval, a major milestone in the development of the project, signifies the completion of a rigorous and comprehensive evaluation that has engaged environmental and energy experts at dozens of federal and state regulatory agencies.”“Obtaining FERC approval significantly de-risks the project execution with defined environmental stipulations.”“Our momentum continues as we complete our assessment of the project’s economics and competitiveness, and engage with potential project partners to determine the best path forward for the Alaska LNG Project.”“The Alaska LNG Project presents an opportunity to unlock significant benefits from Alaska’s stranded North Slope natural gas, including a new reliable and affordable clean energy source, the creation of a substantial number of high-paying construction and operations jobs for Alaskans, and long-term US energy security.”last_img read more

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White House Honors TOTE CEO for Leading U.S. Maritime Industry Toward Gas as Fuel

first_imgTOTE, Inc. President & CEO Anthony Chiarello is among 11 individuals honored by the White House as 2014 transportation industry “Champions of Change.” Chiarello was chosen for his role in leading the U.S. maritime industry toward natural gas as fuel.Chiarello joined fellow honorees and guests in the South auditorium of the White House on May 13 to accept recognition and share insights during a panel discussion titled: “Opening Doors for Opportunity.”TOTE is building the first natural gas-powered container ships in the world to serve Puerto Rico and is converting its ships in Alaska to natural gas; TOTE is the first in the United States to convert its fleet to liquefied natural gas (LNG).The experience has been both exciting and humbling for Chiarello, a fourth-generation member of the shipping and logistics industry.“As a Jones Act domestic carrier, we’re uniquely positioned to create real change in the supply conundrum – availability of fuel is a big hurdle for most transportation sectors to change over to clean-burning natural gas,” Chiarello wrote in a post he prepared for the White House Champions of Change blog. “Our regular service routes create enough of a steady demand to entice fuel partners to build liquefaction plants in our ports of call, thus making LNG supply available to others in those markets. Supply in Jacksonville, Florida and Tacoma, Washington will serve the Southeast and Pacific Northwest with natural gas that can be used for ships, trucks, and rail.”TOTE announced plans to convert its fleet to natural gas in 2012. Since then, natural gas suppliers have begun creating distribution networks in major U.S. ports, making gas available to all transportation modes in those markets. Natural gas-powered ships will achieve emissions reductions far below even the world’s most stringent regulatory standards. These emissions reductions will have long-lasting and far-reaching positive effects on the health and safety of citizens along the U.S. coastline – particularly in Washington, Alaska, Florida, and Puerto Rico, where TOTE ships are part of the critical domestic supply chain. As the adoption of natural gas fuel spreads, air emissions will be lowered along the coastline as part of the North American Emissions Control Area, and additional environmental benefits will accrue in ports, and on roads and rail lines.“It is an honor to stand among the 2014 Transportation Champions of Change representing TOTE and Saltchuk,” Chiarello continued. “My colleagues and I are proud of our investments into new technology as a reflection of our commitment to the people and customers of Alaska and Puerto Rico. We’re equally pleased to help move the U.S. toward natural gas as a marine transportation fuel while providing the most advanced, safe, reliable service possible.”[mappress]Press Release, May 16, 2014; Image: TOTElast_img read more

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UNCTAD: Commercial Fleet Marks Slowest Annual Growth in a Decade

first_imgThe world’s commercial fleet grew less and got older in 2014 than in any other 12-month period in over a decade, with the effects of mergers in liner shipping becoming more prominent, the UNCTAD Review of Maritime Transport 2015 reveals. At the beginning of 2015, the fleet totalled 89,464 vessels, with overall 1.75 billion in deadweight tonnage, a 3.5% percent increase year-on-year, and the lowest annualgrowth rate in over a decade.Data on fleet deployment illustrate the process of concentration in liner shipping, which has seen the recent mergers of Compañía Sudamericana de Vapores and Hapag-Lloyd, and Compañía Chilena de Navegación Interoceánica and Hamburg Süd. While the container-carrying capacity per provider for each country tripled between 2004 and 2015, the average number of companies that provide services to each country’s ports decreased by 29 per cent.Both trends illustrate two sides of the same coin: as ships get bigger and companies aim at achieving economies of scale, there remain fewer companies in individual markets.The Review of Maritime Transport 2015 says that it will be a challenge for policymakers to support technological advances and cost savings, for example through economies of scale, yet at the same time ensure a sufficiently competitive environment so that cost savings are effectively passed on to the clients, that is, importers and exporters.At the beginning of 2015, the report reveals, the top 10 liner shipping companies operated more than 61 per cent of the global container fleet, and the top 20 controlled 83 per cent of all container-carrying capacity. Together, the three largest companies have a share of almost 35 per cent of the world total.All companies with vessels on the order book are investing in larger vessels, with the average vessel size being larger than the current average container-carrying capacity. This attempt to realize economies of scale increases the risk of oversupply, UNCTAD notes.The average vessel size for all new vessels on order by the top 15 companies is above 10,000 twenty-foot equivalent units, which is double the current average size of vessels in the existing fleet of each company. Only very few companies outside the top 20 carriers have placed any new orders and these orders are for far smaller vessel sizes.Rates of tonnage added to the global fleet continued to decline in absolute terms compared to previous years. The report notes, however, that the overall growth rate of tonnage remained above indicators such as that of global gross domestic product and trade growth, and slightly higher than that of the growth of seaborne trade (3.4 per cent in 2014).The Review of Maritime Transport 2015 says that total tonnage delivered in 2014 was only slightly more than half the tonnage delivered in the peak year of the historically largest shipbuilding cycle in 2011. The report explains that because several years pass between the placement of an order for a new ship and its delivery, ships are often ordered when the market is perceived as strong, only to be delivered years later, when the market may have become weaker.As the report explains, tonnage delivered in 2014 had been ordered in some cases as long ago as 2008. While this oversupply may not be good news for shipowners, UNCTAD argues that it is a positive development for the revival of global trade because there is no shortage of carrying capacity and the cost of trade continues to decline in the long term.In addition, the report reveals that, for the first time since the peak of the shipbuilding cycle, the average age of the world fleet increased slightly in 2014. The delivery of fewer new ships, combined with reduced scrapping activity, means that newer tonnage no longer compensates for the natural aging of the fleet.last_img read more

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ERS 2017: Looking beyond the Fourth Railway Package

first_img[<a href="//storify.com/railwaygazette/european-rail-summit-2017" target="_blank">View the story "European Rail Summit 2017" on Storify</a>]Full analysis of the European Rail Summit will appear in the January 2018 issue of Railway Gazette International. EUROPE: ‘Implementation’ was the watchword of speakers and delegates at Railway Gazette Group’s third European Rail Summit, which was hosted by the Representation of the Free State of Bayern to the EU in Brussels on November 7.Entitled ‘Beyond the Fourth Railway Package’, the Summit addressed the policy challenges facing the European rail sector as it looks to implement the market and technical pillars of 4RP while simultaneously responding to a rapidly changing transport market.Our Storify captures the essence of the various presentation and panel discussions throughout the day, and includes a video stream of the keynote address given by Elisabeth Werner, recently appointed Director of Land Transport at DG Move.last_img read more

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Iranian men wear hijab in protest against compulsory veil

first_imghttps://twitter.com/SamanArbabi/status/759076472694923266https://twitter.com/DSRGenealogist/status/759093325941047296https://twitter.com/Gangsterbrain/status/759374687507972096https://twitter.com/purpleview/status/759695483262689280 Picture courtesyMen in Iran have been posting pictures of themselves donning the hijab on social media to protest compulsory hijab. The harsh tag #MenInHijab was coined by an Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad calling on male compatriots to share their photos in support.Alinejad was exiled today in New York in 2014, called on his more than a million followers on Facebook to support the movement, and they have responded in many numbers. The journalist was protesting the statement by head of Iranian diplomacy, Mohammed Javad Zarif, who told a French senator that when tourists are visiting Iran must have compulsory veil according to Jeune Afrique.Alinejad started has a movement ‘ My stealthy freedom’ which calls for the right for individual Iranian women to choose whether they want hijab.Here are some of the posts with men wearing hijabslast_img read more

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Algeria, Spain highlight joint efforts to develop security cooperation

first_imgSudan, Egypt vow to enhance cooperation on security, joint development (Getty Images)Algeria and Spain on Monday highlighted efforts between the two countries to develop security cooperation during Spanish Interior Minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska Gomez’s visit to the North African country, official APS news agency reported.During the talks between Algerian Interior Minister and Grande-Marlaska, they exchanged views on the shared interests of the two countries in the security and civil protection fields, especially the issue of illegal immigration.Beldjoud also underlined joint efforts between the two countries to fight drug networks, particularly in the terms of information exchange.For his part, the Spanish minister highlighted cooperation in the security field to fight organized crime and terrorism in the region, as well as in the areas of civil protection and road safety.Related Cameroon, Saudi Arabia to begin security cooperationcenter_img France Suspends Burundi Security Cooperationlast_img read more

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Newbie Azkals in tough group in AFC Asian Cup

first_imgPlayers and coaching staff of the Philippine Azkals celebrate the squad’s historic qualification to the 2019 AFC Asian Cup after the victory against Tajikistan last Tuesday. AFC MANILA – The Philippine Azkals is up for challenge after being grouped with tougher teams in the 2019 AFC Asian Cup.Azkals was drawn in Group C along with powerhouse squads South Korea, China and Kyrgyzstan.“No easy group for a debutant in this competition,” Azkals team manager Dan Palami said in a statement. “We will have to be in our best form and, for this, the best preparation is needed.”Despite the tough assignment, Philippine Football Federation President Mariano “Nonong” Araneta remains optimistic that the national men’s football squad can make history. “The AFC Asian Cup has a rich history and to be one of the 24 teams competing is already an honor for Philippine football,” Araneta said.The draw of lots held last Friday night at the Armani Hotel in Dubai.Mentored by Thomas Dooley, Azkals reached the AFC Asian Cup for the first time after its come-from-behind 2-1 victory over Tajikistan in the qualifier’s group stage on March 26 at the Rizal Memorial Football Stadium.A total of $15 million is up for grabs in the competition, with the champion winning $5 million and the runners-up getting $3 million.Participating teams earn $200,000 just by being there./PNlast_img read more

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Meyer named GSC Freshman of the Week

first_imgBIRMINGHAM, Ala. – West Florida freshman women’s basketball players continued to collect Gulf South Conference Freshmen of the Week awards, but this time it was Courtney Meyer earning the honor. Meyer earned her first GSC FOW Tuesday, breaking teammate Toni Brewer’s streak of four consecutive FOW awards. A UWF player has now earned the award in five consecutive weeks and eight times this season. Meyer averaged 11.5 points per game while shooting 90 (9-for-10) percent from the field last week. She also averaged 5.5 rebounds per game. The Onalaska, Wisc. native scored a career-high 13 points in a win over Delta State Feb. 5. During the performance she made a pair of game-tying free throws with 1.7 seconds remaining in regulation to send the game to overtime. She followed that performance by scoring 10 points in a win over Mississippi College Feb. 7. Meyer has seen an increase in minutes in recent weeks. She averaged 25 minutes per game in two games last week after averaging less than nine throughout the season. UWF will travel to Memphis, Tenn. to play Christian Brothers Feb. 12 at 5 p.m. For information on all UWF athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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